Injury Prevention

Reinjury risk is highest soon after injury but persists for at least 5 years after initial injury. Periodic interventions through 5 years after injury, particularly in certain high-risk groups, might have lasting effects on reinjury rates.

(Worrell, et al. 2006)

Reinjury risk is highest soon after injury but persists for at least 5 years after initial injury. Periodic interventions through 5 years after injury, particularly in certain high-risk groups, might have lasting effects on reinjury rates.

(Worrell, et al. 2006)

Scarring in the skin after trauma, surgery, burn or sports injury is a major medical problem, often resulting in adverse aesthetics, loss of function, restriction of tissue movement and/or growth and adverse psychological effect.

(Ferguson & O’Kane, 2004)

The central nervous system scarring inhibits neuronal reconnection and hence restoration of neuronal function. In almost every organ and tissue, scarring following injury or trauma is a major problem, for which there are no good preventative or therapeutic regimens.

(Ferguson, 1998)

Scarring in muscle adversely affects movement and can cause ankylosis.

(Ferguson, 1998)

They tried to make me go to rehab but I said, ‘Yes, yes, yes‘.

Once you injure yourself, unfortunately, you will never be 100%. Disordered healing of acute injuries occurs if you do not assess and treat the issue ASAP. The formation of scar tissue will further compromise the joint/s and cause dysfunctional movement to the injured area and to the surrounding areas. Yes, you will heal. Yes, you will feel better as time passes on. The human body is an amazing organism, it will heal with or without external intervention. However, if you do not treat the initial complaint straight away, you will have re-occurrence of pain or discomfort in the future.

How To Develop A Super Back

My multiple back trauma incidents have left me with chronic back weakness that gets aggravated with prolonged sitting, lifting and manual work as a chiropractor. Thoughts of changing my profession lingered overhead. I am at the stage now where I can manage my back weakness and pain.

Also being a researcher, sitting for extended hours at my desk causes my back pain to reappear. In fact, there has been a w h o l e m o n t h  during my intensive research writing period that I found it difficult to continue my exercise rehab program. Technically, I switched my exercise regime for sitting at my desk. Yes, I was in excruciating pain. I feel the pain of my patients.

My back rehabilitation workouts consist of activating my deep intrinsic back muscles. The rehabilitation also focuses on stabilising and strengthening my back.

Although my back pain is not constant I have my bad days and good days and found that constant physical treatment and exercising are my friends in defending off excruciating back pain.

Exercise with me by accessing my workouts

Conquest for Super Back #backtorehab

PRIOR to my back exercise rehabilitation my spine and hips are realigned with chiropractic adjustments for maintenance and to prevent further injury during exercise. This process has been researched by Taimela, S., Diederich, C., Hubsch, M., and Heinricy, M. in 2000 and reported that:

Exercises are beneficial after guided treatment in the maintenance of the results of active treatment for recurrent chronic low back pain in the long term.”

Ferguson, M. W. (1998). Wound healing–scar wars. The Ulster Medical Journal, 67(Suppl 1), 37–40.
Ferguson, M. W., & O’Kane, S. (2004). Scar–free healing: from embryonic mechanisms to adult therapeutic intervention. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 359(1445), 839-850.
Taimela, S., Diederich, C., Hubsch, M., & Heinricy, M. (2000). The role of physical exercise and inactivity in pain recurrence and absenteeism from work after active outpatient rehabilitation for recurrent or chronic low back pain: a follow-up study. Spine, 25(14), 1809-1816.
Worrell SS, Koepsell TD, Sabath DR, Gentilello LM, Mock CN, Nathens AB (2006). The risk of reinjury in relation to time since first injury: a retrospective population-based study. J Trauma,60(2):379-84.